Posts Tagged ‘Knowledge worker’

We’ve got notes – Agile, Jackall, and ‘The’ Un,

April 6, 2013
Cover of "Moral Mazes: The World of Corpo...

Cover via Amazon

  • One of the ways we can take the next step in category management maturity is to become agile. Stay tuned for a fuller development of what this means. For now, I’ll just say that it involves empowerment of teams, treating team members with respect, and harnessing collective intelligence. It involves a higher level of leadership that borrows from what the US Army calls ‘Commander’s Intent’ – i.e. the commander can’t be there to make every decision (or slow things down tremendously if they could), but can influence decisions by focusing on the overall objective.
  • A challenge in becoming agile is that otherwise intelligent ‘knowledge workers’ have, in some cases, become so dependent on falling back on managers to ‘just tell me what you want me to do’ that it will be hard to re-activate the initiative that has gradually been pounded out of them over the years.
  • Couldn’t resist one more on agile…if Hoverstadt and others are to be believed, 70% of change projects fail. Part of the issue – within procurement anyway – is that we spend a good deal of time discussing and training on strategy development, but less time in what makes projects work. One of the keys to strategy is really to have one – whether it is perfect or not is a fun debate, but the key is making a decision and then driving forward. Consultants sometimes like to encourage the development of a big, slow document. The reality is that slow and painful does not drive benefits…action does. Recognizing this reality, then, becomes the first step to making projects agile. We can’t know exactly how the implementation will go up front. So, let’s establish some guiding principles, get them agreed, and get moving. There is a great deal more to making category management agile…that really is just a tease. The challenge awaits.
  • Hilarious quote that I stumbled upon from Robert Jackall in Moral Mazes ‘the basic principles of decision-making in this organization and probably any organization are: (1) Avoid making any decision if at all possible, (2) if a decision has to be made, involve as many people as you can so that, if things go wrong, you’re able to point in as many directions as possible.’ Do we have any hope of moving beyond the blame culture (except in small pockets, of course)?
  • Did anyone see Jon Stewart’s roasting of Kim Jong Un this week? Incredible stuff.
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