Doing is not connected to speaking

by

The coolest thing that I’ve learned about our human minds is that the conscious portion of our brains is merely the PR department for our sub-conscious. The way we decide depends on tens of thousands of years of evolution of genes designed to reproduce themselves. Before the nurture crowd starts screaming, I must also point out that those genes have evolved to adapt to the environment in which we find ourselves. Nature has found that flexible genes work better than inflexible ones.

The latest example comes from Charlie Batch, a man who has made tens of millions over a long career as a quarterback for the Detroit Lions and Pittsburgh Steelers. Check out his story here. The man sounds intelligent…coming across as someone who makes sense and thinks before speaking. In spite of all that, he has managed to squander away tens of millions of dollars. His story is not unique. Mark Brunell made even more and ended up in the same place.

It is true that bad luck plays a part in bankruptcy, but often, overconfidence plays the largest role. Can’t miss construction company, let’s go all in! Of course it sounds silly when I write it like that, but in reality the decision is not presented in such stark terms. It feels like a great opportunity, so the conscious mind starts inventing reasons why it will work. Overconfidence in your own judgment is inherent, especially in men. If it wasn’t, your genes and you wouldn’t be here.

Think about your own lives…how often is someone so supremely confident that they are right, only to be proven wrong? How many times is the most confident person in the room the most intelligent? How many times does the most confident person make everyone else follow him/her to their collective peril, all the while refusing to listen to dissenting opinions?

Ponder…then comment.

Advertisements

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

2 Responses to “Doing is not connected to speaking”

  1. Danielle Says:

    “[H]ow often is someone so supremely confident that they are right, only to be proven wrong?” Usually.

    “How many times is the most confident person in the room the most intelligent?” Never.

    “How many times does the most confident person make everyone else follow him/her to their collective peril, all the while refusing to listen to dissenting opinions?” Most of the time.

    I particularly like your observation that “[o]verconfidence in your own judgment is inherent, especially in men.” I find this to be especially true in the legal profession. I tend to have the opposite problem. But I am reminded (on a daily basis, it seems) that the most confident people are usually the least intelligent. That’s why they are so confident: they aren’t aware or don’t care to know the myriad of things that they could be wrong about. And yet I continue to be fooled by them. One of these days I’ll learn!

  2. David Rajakovich Says:

    Very true…thanks for your comment. Successful people are often good at making people question themselves. However, rarely is there any basis for this feeling. I think it is helpful to teach yourself techniques for asserting your opinions…at times being flexible and at times holding your ground depending on the situation.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: